Yet another Newegg rant

Oct. 1st, 2007

Well, Newegg.com has done it again.

For those of you who haven't kept up with the saga, here's some summaries of the first two issues:

Part 1: I was trying to get my defective motherboard replaced, but when I went to view my RMA page, all of my 2007 purchases had disappeared. I contacted support and was told that my warranties had all expired, even though my motherboard was purchased this March, with a one year warranty. Pointing this out to the agent only had her repeat 'please contact the manufacturer for repair/replacement' ...which was ASUS, who wanted me contact the place of purchase for repair/replacement.

Weeks later my RMA page was fixed, and unlike what the support agent had told me, my warranties had not expired. I finally got to send my motherboard back to get replaced.

Part 2: My replacement motherboard arrives on September 14th and was clearly used with the manual crumpled, the contents packed very unconventionally, and worst of all it was missing a part. I contacted support again and they told me that they'd look in their warehouse for the part and to expect an email from them about it.

And now we come to strike.. er, I mean, Part 3:

Tonight I got an automated email from Newegg.com. It's an RMA Confirmation, they want me to send the motherboard back to them, not for replacement, but for a refund. RMA Reason: Unsatisfied.

On the outside, this doesn't seem like it's that bad, does it? It totally sucks though.
Yet another Newegg rant
To me this seems a very unfriendly response from a company that has always been well known for it's customer support. They're brushing me off, telling me to take my money and leave them alone. I wasn't even worth a human response, just an automated message saying that I was unsatisfied and nothing about how they couldn't find the part. My warranty itself says they only offer a refund for 30 days after purchase, then for the rest of the warranty period they repair or replace the board. I've known of cases where they can't replace the item because it is no longer carried, so they have to refund the money, but this board is still in stock, so that's not the reason.

If I were to send the motherboard back and get a refund, then purchase the same board through Newegg.com I'd have a new, complete motherboard, but I'd be out my previous warranty, which is valid until next March. As shown in the epic part one, the warranty on my motherboard was changed from one year to 30 days after I'd purchased it, meaning my warranty would now be over with around November. To get a one year warranty I'd have to pay $14.99 more to Newegg, not to mention that the refund does not cover the cost of shipping either, which will end up being around $6.

Although, purchasing from Newegg.com again at this point seems out of the question to me after all of this. I mean, sheesh, all these problems just for one return? So it's true, I'm unsatisfied, but not with the motherboard, with Newegg. Since the missing part was trivial (the IO plate) I ended up installing it, and it works totally great and I'm very happy with it.
I'm not entirely sure what to do, I've sent a "What the heck?" email to Newegg about it the most recent happening, explaining that I was not happy about the refund and that it would cost me a large portion of my warranty. So, I don't think that I will end up sending the board back for a refund as it seems I lose out too much.

One of the options I have is buying the part from ASUS (note to self: this is it) which will end up being 10 bucks shipped. That way my warranty on this replacement board will be until March, instead of November-ish if I were to purchase a new board. Also the best part, no down time.. well, except for when I have to remove the motherboard to install the part, but that won't be that bad.

It's rather unpleasant to believe that I will have to purchase the part myself though. I have heartburn now. Sheesh.  


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